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Paternal Diet And Sperm Health
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February 21, 2017

Birth Month and Autism Risk

An astute reader of Deep Nutrition points out the connection between holiday season indulgences in high carb and vegetable oil rich foods and increased risk of autism.
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November 29, 2015

Making veggies look bad

If you are someone with heart disease, or are at risk for heart disease or simply want to make the right nutritional choices, this article will help you understand how statisticians have misled us into being afraid of natural saturated fats, and fats in general.
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April 28, 2012

The Miracle Moment: How to help an autistic child step into the world

Twenty years ago diabetes was assumed to be a genetic disorder. Now we understand that diabetes is a consequence of unhealthy diet and other lifestyle factors. Just as those of us physicians in the low-carb community currently use diet to prevent and even reverse diabetes and its complications, I believe we will soon see similar progress in treating and preventing autism.
How To Be Beautiful: Care About Your Kids
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March 17, 2012

How to be Beautiful: Care About Your Kids

This week I got a letter from a newlywed couple telling me how happy they were to learn the specific dietary changes they can make to better ensure the health of their future baby. Most people who read Deep Nutrition, I'm happy to say, wind up liking it. But every once in a while we get a hate mail or a negative review on Amazon explaining in explicit detail exactly why we should pack our bags and return to whatever corner of Hell we came from.
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August 11, 2010

Early Puberty: What does it mean for tomorrow’s women?

Abnormal sexual development from unclear cause, environmental changes suspected. According to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics, 1 in 10 girls in second and third grade, of Caucasian descent, showed stage 2 breast development (small mounds of tissue under the nipple area), which is considered the first sign of sexual maturation. This is an increase of two hundred percent since the 1980s. For African American girls, the increase is even more alarming, with nearly one in four 7 and 8 year-olds showing the early breast signs. The causes are unclear, but suspects include: Pthallates, compounds that make their…

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